April 17, 2014

Role of Russian Gas in Ukraine

Chi Chyong, European Council on Foreign Relations

The Associated Press

After the annexation of Crimea in March 2014, three other regions in eastern Ukraine (Kharkiv, Donetsk, and Luhansk) have demanded a referendum on secession from Ukraine by 11 May. All four regions are crucial to the country’s economic development. Together, they account for one-third of total export receipts and generate a quarter of Ukraine’s GDP. The current political situation has created even more doubts on the future of energy in Ukraine, which rests heavily on the tense gas relations between Russia and Ukraine.

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TAGGED: Europe, Ukraine, Natural Gas, Russia

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