April 22, 2014

We Mess with Europe's Borders at Our Peril

Chris Huhne, The Guardian

The Associated Press

One of the greatest problems with foreign and defence policy is understanding the real motives for a state's action. No one knows Vladimir Putin's real intentions over Ukraine – perhaps not even the Russian leader himself. Any good liberal may hope that Putin is as respectful of international law as he claims, and that his interests extend merely to protecting the Russian-speaking minorities. However, the Geneva deal agreed between Russia and the west on Thursday is a thin reed that can mean too many things to too many people.

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TAGGED: Chris Huhne, Vladimir Putin, Russia, Ukraine

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