May 11, 2014

Where Will Putin Turn Next?

Masha Gessen, Washington Post

The Associated Press

Putin sees no such country as Ukraine. He sees lands that are rightfully Russian, lands that can be claimed by Western European countries, and then maybe they can discuss what to do with the rest. When Putin made his apparently conciliatory remarks on Wednesday, he hardly contradicted himself: The important message was that the fate of Ukraine can and should be decided in Putin’s negotiations with European leaders, held in the Kremlin, as his meeting with Swiss president Didier Burkhalter was that day.

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TAGGED: Ukraine, Crimea, Russia, Vladimir Putin

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