May 23, 2014

In the Land of Nigeria's Kidnapped Girls

Chika Oduah, The Atlantic

The Associated Press

On Monday morning, May 12, I sat in the backseat of a Toyota Corolla, headed to Chibok. With a satin abaya draping my body in a sheath of black, and my hair curled underneath a black chiffon hijab, my careful effort to blend into northeastern Nigeria’s conservative, predominately Muslim society appeared to be working. The soldiers who peered into the backseat gave me casual glances, waving us past checkpoint after checkpoint. “This is the heartland of Boko Haram,” said the governor of Borno State when I visited him in the state capital of Maiduguri along the way.

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TAGGED: Nigeria, Boko Haram

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