June 2, 2014

Reason Still Rules in Europe

Anatole Kaletsky, Reuters

The Associated Press

When can a vote of 25 percent be described as a “stunning victory” or even a “political earthquake”? According to the European establishment, it’s when these votes go to a rabble of odd-ball extremists, ranging from overt racists and even disciples of Adolf Hitler to unreconstructed Stalinists and comically naïve anarchists. However, the most alarming symptom of political breakdown revealed by the European parliament election is mainstream politician’s hysterical reaction to a perfectly predictable — and justifiable — upsurge of populist anger after the euro crisis.

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TAGGED: European Union, Europe

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