June 17, 2014

The Sectarian Myth of Iraq

Sami Ramadani, The Guardian

The Associated Press

Until the 1970s nearly all Iraq's political organisations were secular, attracting people from all religions and none. The dividing lines were sharply political, mostly based on social class and political orientation. The growth of religious parties followed Saddam's ruthless elimination of all political entities other than the Ba'ath party. Places of worship became centres of political agitation and organisation.

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TAGGED: Shiite, Sunni, Baath Party, Middle East, Iraq

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