June 27, 2014

Taiwan Looks at Hong Kong in Terror

Adam Minter, Bloomberg

The Associated Press

Fear of China’s growing influence over Taiwan drove thousands of students to occupy Taiwan’s national legislature earlier this year. Such anxiety isn't theoretical. It’s real, embodied in the compromises made by Taiwan's unification-minded government and, more important, in Hong Kong, where, since 1997, Chinese influence and power has grown at the expense of the city’s unique laissez-faire culture. Especially for Taiwan’s younger generation, that’s something to fear. “Today’s Hong Kong, tomorrow’s Taiwan,” they chanted as they stormed the legislature.

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TAGGED: China, Hong Kong, Taiwan

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