July 1, 2014

Shanghai: A Great Jewish City

J. Gewirtz & J. McAuley, The New Republic

AP Photo

As early as 1845, when Shanghai was forcibly opened to foreign trade under the unequal treaties that concluded the Opium Wars, a network of prominent Sephardic Jewish merchant families—the Kadoories, the Hardoons, the Ezras, the Nissims, the Abrahams, the Gubbays, and, most prominently, the Sassoons—took root in the city and eventually joined the ranks of its Western occupying elite.

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TAGGED: Jews, China, Shanghai

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