July 4, 2014

Will Japan's Democracy Survive Abe?

William Pesek, Bloomberg

The Associated Press

Japan has every right to defend itself. It's been a good global citizen since 1945 and deserves a permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council. If its people support a change in the pacifist Article 9 of the postwar constitution, then so be it. But Abe should hold a national referendum on the issue, and lawmakers in his Liberal Democratic Party shouldn't give him carte blanche to pretend Japanese law allows what it forbids.

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TAGGED: Japan, Shinzo Abe

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