July 23, 2014

In a Syrian City, ISIS Puts Vision into Practice

Ben Hubbard, New York Times

The Associated Press

Long before extremists rolled through Iraq and seized a large piece of territory, the group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria took over most of Raqqa Province, home to about a million people, and established a headquarters in its capital. Through strategic management and brute force, the group, which now calls itself simply the Islamic State, has begun imposing its vision of a state that blends its fundamentalist interpretation of Islam with the practicalities of governance.

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TAGGED: Middle East, Syria, Iraq, Islamic State Of Iraq And Al-Sham, ISIS

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