July 24, 2014

Middle East Violence Not Just 'Ancient Hatred'

Shadi Hamid, The Atlantic

The Associated Press

A believer in the possibilities of coexistence, Sayed Kashua is, or perhaps was, the most prominent Arab-Israeli author writing in Hebrew. Punctured with staccato prose, his column on leaving Jerusalem, perhaps forever, was a beautifully written, heartbreaking admission of defeat. For him, the notion that Arabs and Jews could live together had been shattered. “All those who told me there is a difference between blood and blood, between one person and another person, were right,” Kashua concluded.

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TAGGED: Multiculturalism, Arab Spring, Middle East

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