August 7, 2014

Canada's Corruption by China's Dirty Money

Terry Glavin, Ottawa Citizen

To comprehend just how far the corrupting rot of dirty Chinese money has spread throughout Canada, uproars unfolding in Calgary, Vancouver and Ottawa at the moment are immediately instructive. Their lessons should also drive home what it was that Anthony Campbell, the former head of the Intelligence Assessment Secretariat of the Privy Council Office, was on about two years ago when he told me: “We’re sitting ducks.”

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TAGGED: China, Canada, Oil Sands

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