August 11, 2014

Japan Needs More Jim Beam

William Pesek, Bloomberg

N/A

Japan needs more gusty moves overseas. In this regard, few even come close to SoftBank's Masayoshi Son. This week, local media circled Japan's second-richest man to chronicle his comeuppance over a failed nine-month effort to acquire T-Mobile US. What I'm more intrigued about is what's next for the Son after last year's cross-border triumph buying Sprint? Where might a guy with the smarts 14 years ago to invest in Alibaba, this year's sexist initial public offering, be looking? Let's give Son an "A" for effort and stop the Monday-morning quarterbacking. Too bad there aren't more in Japan like him.

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TAGGED: Jim Beam, Alcohol, Japan

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