August 13, 2014

Why the Afghan Election Still Isn't Over

Thomas Scherer, Washington Post

The Associated Press

Why have the candidates continued to fight? There was almost certainly fraud on both sides as supporters took advantage of Afghanistan’s insecurity and institutional deficits and found varying ways to “rock the vote.” However, the mere presence of fraud rarely matters; the fraud must be great enough to change the results. The preliminary results of the June 14 run-off show Ghani ahead with 4.5 million votes to Abdullah’s 3.5 million, about 56 percent to 44 percent. Does Abdullah really believe that he can overcome a million-vote difference?

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TAGGED: Afghanistan, Abdullah Abdullah, Ashraf Ghani

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