August 15, 2014

Putin's Sleight-of-Hand Invasion

Anna Nemtsova, The Daily Beast

The Associated Press

On Thursday night a caravan of about 270 Russian military trucks, all freshly painted white, parked in a field outside the small town of Kamensk-Shakhtinsky about 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) from the Ukrainian border. But long after dark, according to a report by a correspondent for The Guardian who happened on the scene, 23 Russian armored personnel carriers crossed through a gap in the barbed wire fence onto a dirt track in an area no longer guarded by Ukrainian troops.

If so, official Kiev seems to be lost.

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TAGGED: Russia, Vladimir Putin, Ukraine

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