August 15, 2014

The Fantasy of Mideast Moderates

Fareed Zakaria, Washington Post

The Associated Press

For decades, U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East has been to support “moderates.” The problem is that there are actually very few of them. The Arab world is going through a bitter, sectarian struggle that is “carrying the Islamic world back to the Dark Ages,” said Turkish President Abdullah Gul. In these circumstances, moderates either become extremists or they lose out in the brutal power struggles of the day. Look at Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya and the Palestinian territories.

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TAGGED: Middle East, Hillary Clinton, Arab Spring, Egypt, Islamic State, ISIS, Syria, Iraq

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