August 16, 2014

Obama Should Have Listened to Hillary

Charles Krauthammer, National Post

AP Photo

Leave it to Barack Obama’s own former secretary of state to acknowledge the fatal flaw of his foreign policy: a total absence of strategic thinking. Mind you, Obama does deploy grand words proclaiming grand ideas: the “new beginning” with Islam declared in Cairo, the reset with Russia announced in Geneva, global nuclear disarmament proclaimed in Prague (and playacted in a Washington summit). Untethered from reality, they all disappeared without a trace. When carrying out policies in the real world, however, it’s nothing but tactics and reactive improvisation.

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TAGGED: Gaza, Russia, U.S. Foreign Policy, ISIS, Iraq, Hillary Clinton, Syria, Barack Obama

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