August 26, 2014

Will 'El-Qaida' Swarm Us from Mexico?

Joshua Keating, Slate

The Associated Press

The Mexican government is expressing some irritation with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who suggested last week that there’s a “very real possibility” that members of ISIS or other terrorist groups are entering the U.S. illegally via Mexico. As Perry acknowledged in his own remarks—and as the Pentagon confirmed—there’s “no clear evidence” that this is happening. But as is generally the case when fears of “El Qaida” periodically emerge, a lack of evidence is no barrier to bold sweeping claims.

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TAGGED: Al-Qaeda, Terrorism, Immigration

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