Brazil

República Federativa do Brasil

Look for Rousseff’s campaign, led by one of Brazil’s sharpest political operatives, to paint Neves as an out-of-touch elite beholden to fat cats and banks. And expect N...(full article)

If you had asked a pundit three months ago to predict the first round of Brazil’s presidential election on Oct. 5, the response would more or less have resembled what has tur...(full article)

Brazil’s economic growth has slowed to its weakest three-year pace in a decade, advancing just 2.1 percent on average from 2011 through 2013. In the first half of 2014, it en...(full article)

Brazil's presidential campaign has taken a series of dramatic turns befitting a Brazilian soap opera over the last two months. The election was marked first by tragedy, with the de...(full article)

Silva could expect a boost from investors: the real would probably strengthen if she won, and bond yields might narrow. Ms Rousseff, by contrast, is likely to face market headwinds...(full article)

Most Recent Articles

Brazil May Choose Experience over Change - Roger Noriega, RCW

Silva's steady rise in the polls buoyed private-sector hopes, but markets tumbled this week after a series of polls showed Silva losing her lead over the incumbent in the projected...

Brazil Shows Clinton's Soft View on Inequality - N. Scheiber, New Republic

Clinton has argued that the answer is to boost the economic lot of “people on the bottom and people in the middle class [who] no longer feel like they have the opportunity to...

Marina Silva: Meeting Brazil's "Obama" - David Rothkopf, Foreign Policy

The example offered by the Brazilian elections is one illustrating the promise of democracy for remaking societies, righting old wrongs, and offering a voice to the disenfranchised...

Outsider Shakes Up Brazilian Politics - John Lyons, Wall Street Journal

RIO BRANCO, Brazil— Marina Silva started life as the child of illiterate rubber tappers trudging malarial jungles to collect latex sap in a remote corner of Brazil's Amazon. ...

Brazil's Election Draped in Mourning - Mac Margolis, Bloomberg View

Twenty years ago, when he debuted in national politics, Eduardo Campos, the Brazilian presidential hopeful who died in a plane crash yesterday, was easy to underestimate. With his ...

Malice in Brazil's Palace - Mac Margolis, Bloomberg View

Now Rousseff has her very own affront to manage. This one wasn't just about eavesdropping on unwitting citizens, but a cybersmear campaign against journalists. And while no one fro...

Brazil Crossed the Line on Israel - Andres Oppenheimer, Miami Herald

Israel can be blamed for failing to prevent civilian deaths in specific cases during the Gaza conflict, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government can also be blamed ...

Brazil's Dilma Down, but Not Out - Andres Oppenheimer, Miami Herald

If Rousseff’s chances to win reelection were of 60 or 70 percent before last week’s soccer debacle, I would put them at 51 percent now. It’s going to be a much ti...

Brazil's Saddest Fan Offers Lesson in Sportsmanship - Boston Globe

The so-called saddest fan in Brazil offered a powerful lesson in classy sportsmanship during his country’s humiliating defeat Tuesday against Germany in the World Cup. Images of ...

Why Germany Crushed Brazil - Leonid Bershidsky, Bloomberg View

Germans are having a hard time believing what happened Tuesday night in Brazil. Sure, they are celebrating their country's 7:1 win over the home favorites in a World Cup semifinal ...

World Cup Loss Threatens Dilma's Reelection - Nery & Cruz, Folha

What will be the political and economic reverberations of Tuesday's historic humiliation of Brazil’s soccer team? The government of President Dilma Rousseff is already on alert,...

When American Confederates Fled to Brazil - Stephen Bloom, Narratively

After the American Civil War, some 7,000 Confederates set sail for Brazil. Their Dixie-loving descendants represent one of the most curious cultures in the modern world....

World Cup Revives Old Border Wars - Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post

And then there were eight. The World Cup quarterfinals kick off Friday with two regional grudge matches: Brazil takes on an effervescent Colombia in the city of Fortaleza, while Fr...

A Very Un-American Triumph - John Cassidy, The New Yorker

How do you celebrate a loss? The English, who have long glorified their country’s valiant second-place finishers, don’t have a problem with it. But Americans? Surely, w...

Inside Brazil's Most Infamous Brothel - Amos Barshad, Rolling Stone

Full of beautiful women and XXX behavior, Rio de Janeiro's Centaurus has enticed celebrities, soccer stars and anyone else willing to pay a fee and go inside. We go behind the door...

The Day We Fell in Love with the World Cup - John Cassidy, New Yorker

Americans, like practically everybody else, have gone a little World Cup crazy. As a lifelong soccer nut, and a naturalized American citizen, I welcome this development—and readi...

Americans Love Soccer -- They Just Don't Get It - Chicago Tribune

An epic fail by the U.S. team? No. Just an epic disappointment for its fans. Silvestre Varela's goal in the final seconds was like a walk-off homer — if a walk-off homer coul...

Note to U.S.: Elite World Cup Teams Don't Gag - Nancy Armour, USA Today

They were less than a minute away from a huge win, the humidity was oppressive and the Americans were gassed. None of it is any excuse. The Americans blew this game, and it could...

Is Brazil Still the Country of the Future? - Aaron Renn, New Geography

Not long ago, Brazil was riding high. It was feted as one of the “BRIC” nations destined to be the next world economic powers. The commodities boom had its natural reso...

The Legacy of Brazil's World Cup Protests - Mimi Whitefield, Miami Herald

Protestors in a handful of Brazilian cities have clashed with police, thrown rocks and dodged rubber bullets and tear gas canisters since last week’s opening of the World Cup...

Corruption Rumors Sideline Beautiful Game - Kevin Rafferty, Japan Times

The drama swirling behind the FIFA scenes would be greeted with incredulity if the house of FIFA were turned into a steamy novel or soap opera. Uruguayan journalist Eduardo Galeano...

Will This Be the Last World Cup? - Jason Cowley, New Statesman

Football is a supreme instrument of soft power and can unite people as little else can. But allegations of Fifa corruption have tarnished the image of the beautiful game. Can anyth...

The Shady Underside of the World's Favorite Game - China Post

The success of the World Cup comes almost despite, rather than because of, the supervision of the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). Described by the Financi...

How Brazil's Hubris Jeopardized Its World Cup - Tim Padgett, WLRN

An event meant to showcase Brazil’s arrival as a developed nation has so far served as a reminder of the flaws that thwart its aspirations. Dysfunctional bureaucracy, brazen ...

The Last Democratic World Cup? - Anne Applebaum, Washington Post

The aftermath in Brazil will be different only because the regret arrived in advance. For months now, protesters of various stripes have picketed stadiums, dressed the World Cup ma...

Is Manaus Too Hot for British Footballers? - Thais Brianezi, Conversation

The relationship between the Brazilian city of Manaus and the English football team didn’t get off to a great start. Before the World Cup draw in December last year, England mana...

Brazil Needs More than a World Cup Win - Bloomberg View

Brazil is favored to win this year's World Cup, which starts today. Yet the cost of hosting the games, along with some expensive promises made by a president seeking re-election, m...

Will Brazil's Cup Spotlight Burn Too Bright? - Brad Brooks, Associated Press

Brazil's day has finally arrived. The sun rises Thursday on a tropical nation hosting its first World Cup in 64 years. Nearly half the world's population, well over 3 billion spec...

How to Be a Good World Cup Host - Erin Conway-Smith, Global Post

Feel it, Brazil. The soccer World Cup is here. The world is watching, the fans are pumped and the Brazilian people are — well, not exactly at fever pitch with excitement. An...

Life Still a Struggle for Brazil's New Middle Class - Vincent Bevins, LAT

Experts say the prospects of these newly empowered Brazilians with household incomes between $775 and $3,400 a month are crucial to a country of 200 million people that long has su...

World Cup Means Big Money for Drug Traffickers - Juan Castro, AFP

Drug cartels in Peru and Bolivia, two of the world's top producers of cocaine, are drooling over the bountiful market being served up next door by the World Cup in Brazil. They ar...

World Cup Aside, Brazil's Economy Stinks - America Economia

In late January, a mass of black foam — the result of untreated sewage — covered 800 kilometers of Brazil's coastline. It looked particularly shocking in Guanabara Bay,...

World Cup Fans Face Rough Landing in Brazil - Licon & Barchfield, AP

Before they see their teams battle on the fields, soccer fans arriving in Brazil will first have to fight their way past airport scaffolding, terminal flooding and two-hour taxi li...

Will Host Brazil Win the World Cup? - Cesar Chelala, Japan Times

When Diego Maradona was asked in 1998 who would win that year’s soccer World Cup being played in France, he said, “Countries organize the World Cup to win it,” th...

Brazil's Crime Crisis Worsening - Muggah & de Carvalho, Miami Herald

With the World Cup coming to town this month, Brazilians are busily preparing for a party. But keep your wits about you if you want to join in -- these are dark days for Brazil....

Brazil Is Totally Screwed - Shannon Sims, Foreign Policy

But if the piles of garbage seemed high after Carnaval, imagine during the World Cup. Hosting the world's biggest sporting event, which begins on June 12 and runs for a month, was ...

Throw FIFA Out of the Game - Dave Zirin, New York Times

People don’t have to be displaced and workers don’t need to die for soccer. The World Cup can be staged in countries with existing stadiums and infrastructure. Moreover...

Brazil's Bumpy Path to Oil Superpower - Vinod Sreeharsha, Miami Herald

Brazil’s efforts to become one of the world’s major oil producers have attracted businesses such as U.S. drilling giants Halliburton and Baker Hughes, gained it partnerships wi...

World Cup Should Belong to the World, Not FIFA - Business Day

As SA experienced, the Fifa stranglehold means the benefits flow disproportionately to Fifa and the Blatter family, not to entrepreneurs in the host nation. And that is just the ab...

Is the World Cup a Giant Waste of Money? - Doug Saunders, Globe and Mail

Much as London tried to use the 2012 Summer Games to revivify a rotted corner of the East End, and Vancouver used the Winter Games to create a better highway from Vancouver to Whis...

Brazil's World Cup Is a Nightmare - Vac Verikaitis, The Daily Beast

Brazilians angry at their government and FIFA could turn this giant soccer tournament into a tipping point. Are these corrupt, elitist spectacles worth it?...

The Anarchists Who Plan to Go Nuts at the World Cup - Ioan Grillo, GP

Brazil's police allege the militants form an extremist group called the Black Bloc, and say they are watching its leaders. The local press has published exposes claiming that the B...

Brazil's President Is Running Scared - Raul Gallegos, Bloomberg View

Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff, who is running for re-election in October, is starting to look desperate. Her approval ratings show why: at 37 percent they’re near t...

High Cost, Corruption Claims Mar Brazil World Cup - Bradley Brooks, AP

The cost of building Brasilia's World Cup stadium has nearly tripled to $900 million in public funds, largely due to allegedly fraudulent billing, government auditors say. The spik...

Time for West to Press China on Climate Change - Dallas Morning News

Roughly 65 percent of China’s energy consumption comes from coal-fired power plants — a major source of greenhouse-gas pollution. Brazil, host to the world’s largest tropical...

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